April 1, 2021

This is a post from Inside Higher Education titled “The Strange Case of the Exploding Student Workload” that addresses the apparent contradiction between faculty members’ view that they are assigning less work and students’ view that they are doing more work.

 


 

Guest Post: The Strange Case of the Exploding Student Workload | Just Visiting – Inside Higher Ed
www.insidehighered.com
Jody Greene, associate vice provost for teaching and learning and director of the Center for Innovations in Teaching and Learning at the University of California, Santa Cruz, explores a seeming conundrum. Be the first to know …

 

Teaching: Looking Back on 2020
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This is an article from the Chronicle of Higher Education that reviews some of the topics covered in their Teaching column during 2020. It gives links to articles about topics such as transitioning to remote teaching, student engagement, supporting student, and faculty burnout.


August 20, 2020

Student Survey Findings

Based on  the results of an anonymous survey of 3,133 undergraduate students at 31 universities across the U.S. conducted last spring, the Rutgers University researchers developed five lessons for faculty teaching synchronously or asynchronously online. They include suggestions for minimizing cognitive load, creating community and interpersonal connections, and working with inadequate resources. 

View the summary of the findings at the Center for Teaching Excellence SharePoint site below. ​​​​​​​

 


Left To Their Own Devices – Medium
medium.com
Rutgers researchers surveyed 3,113 U.S. undergraduates about remote learning experiences in April & May 2020. This collection of findings has lessons for how to redesign remote instruction to be …

Leading Synchronous Online Discussions

The Center for Teaching at Vanderbilt University has posted the following suggestions regarding leading synchronous online discussions on Zoom. The post provides specific recommendations for encouraging participation (i.e., icebreakers, polls, and asynchronous discussion boards) and group discussion techniques (i.e., fishbowl, breakout rooms with an opportunity to report out, everyone reports out).


New Resource on Leading Synchronous Online Discussions
cft.vanderbilt.edu